Day 8: Distract yourself

My inspirational outlet at work comes in the form of Banangram tiles. While working, I spend a fair amount of day looking for just the right word to express a given thought accurately. But what I love about these tiles is there is no "best" word (unless you're playing strategically I guess). I get to sit back and search for a word that doesn't need to express any particular meaning, but rather just happens to fit the letters I have in front of me. It's freeing. For me it feels like the difference between baking for fun as opposed to out of hunger. 

Although I will admit, I'm always a little afraid that the words I find reveal something about my subconscious self. There are days when I find several negative words in a row, and I start to worry about my state of mind. But for the most part that theory sounds a bit too much like some sort of Facebook spam, "The first 3 words you find in this crossword reveal what you're really like!" 

I realized something today on day 8: There is such thing as good distractions. I've never really thought of distractions in a positive light, and especially in a setting such as work. I was often called distracting growing up (though I'm sure it had nothing to do with my "look at me, look at me!" requests). By very definition a distraction is something that impedes concentration, and concentration is good, right? Right. But. We may find a few obvious "good distractions" such as distracting someone from physical pain like when getting a shot or keeping them from fixating on something negative. I always enjoyed distracting my nephews from their favorite noisy, obnoxious toy when they were little. But work isn't necessarily negative, so why would you want to distract yourself from that? I see a lot of value from allowing your brain an opportunity to change gears, especially if you work in a creative field. But at the same time I think it's important to control your own distraction. If others are always distracting you, you have little control over when you get back to a concentrated state. However if you take 5 minutes away for a specific task (such as Bananagrams), you are in charge of getting yourself back as well. Because distractions will come in one form or another, so why not be the one controlling the narrative?

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